Search and rescue trials

UMES

While search and rescue dogs are first and foremost used in life-saving operations, the International Rescue Dog Organisation has also organised a world championship in various disciplines, including area and rubble searches, tracking and water rescue.

  • Print
  • Increase text size Diminish text size

All competing dogs must complete two common test series:

- Obedience: including heeling on and off lead, adopting positions on command, standing still, retrieving, sociability with strangers and sending out.

- Dexterity: dealing with a series of unstable obstacles simulating real-life situations, such as tunnels, jumps and horizontal ladders.

Each team is judged on its performance in its preferred operational discipline:

- Searching for people under rubble: five people need to be found within forty minutes.

- Searching for missing persons without scent: five people lost in woods or injured must be found within forty minutes.

- Searching for missing persons with scent: the dog must follow a trail and find five objects dropped by the victim and then find the victim.

- Water rescue.

This competitive side to a highly professionalised discipline (search and rescue dogs are most often trained and used by police, military, emergency services and mountain rescue teams) brings together teams from about fifteen countries every year, enabling them to share their training methods. Obviously, success in competition does not guarantee success in real-life situations.

UMES
  • Print
  • Back to top
Attribute Type Value
//
Search and rescue trials
    Search and rescue trials

    Related medias

    Related articles